Seal woman

The legend of Kópakonan, literally meaning “the Seal Woman”,
is one of the best-known folktales in the Faroe Islands.

“Seals were believed to be former human beings who voluntarily sought death in the ocean. Once a year, on the Thirteenth night, they were allowed to come on land, strip off their skins and amuse themselves as human beings, dancing and enjoying themselves”
*read full part of the myrth: Kópakonan

“A statue of Kópakonan was raised in Mikladalur on the island of Kalsoy in August 2014. The statue is designed to withstand 13metre waves. In early 2015, a 11.5metre wave swept over the statue. It stood firm and no damage was caused”
Watch this short clip from that particularly stormy day in 2015.

Sculpture made by Hans Pauli Olsen

21 tanker om “Seal woman

  1. Pingback: Action Men with Duct Tape, Part 5 (Mystery Comedy Serial) – Susan Joy Clark

  2. Beautiful photos again. I like the seal woman statue. I believe the Irish have a similar mythology about seal people called Selkies.

    I tried pinging you. In my latest fiction serial, I have some Danish phrases taken from Google Translate. If you have time, I would love it if you could look over it and check that it is sensible in the context. 🙂 https://susan-joy-clark.com/2021/07/08/action-men-with-duct-tape-part-5-mystery-comedy-serial/

    • You are right – in Celtic and Norse mythology have this in common. At least known on Iceland, Faroe Island, Shetland Islands, Orkney Island and probably some more.

      By the way most of nowadays celebrations have their roots in celtic, norse and similar mythologies – find it fascinating myself, that some traditions have so “far back tracks”. Such as celebration of summer solstice, winter solstice, spring, autumn and much more can be traced far back. 🙂

      Will refresh my danish. 😀

      • Thank you for your nice answer. Yes, it is interesting. Names for days of the week and months have ties to mythology in English and other languages. A lot of Christian holidays have some mythological traditions mixed in with them. The word Easter is really a name for a goddess, also called Ishtar. That bothers some Christians, and they will say “Resurrection Sunday” instead of Easter. If I do say “Easter,” I am not usually thinking of its mythological meaning, though I am aware of it.

    • Right – in Celtic and Norse mythology have this in common. At least known on Iceland, Faroe Island, Shetland Islands, Orkney Island and probably some more.

      By the way most of nowadays celebrations have their roots in celtic, norse and similar mythologies – find it fascinating myself, that some traditions have so “far back tracks”. Such as celebration of summer solstice, winter solstice, spring, autumn and much more can be traced far back. 🙂

        • I guess everyone is inspired by something, most of all those who claim the opposite. 😀
          Perhaps that’s why the word evolution/development was invented.? 😀

  3. What a nice legend. It is lovely that they have kept the myth alive. I checked out the youtube video and those seas were rough! But the statue looks strong and stoic in amongst the boiling waves.

  4. Pingback: Cool Public Art – Cool Esse

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