Travel Theme (Signs)

 Inspired by the excellent post by Ailsa (link) and Madhu (link) after the great idea of Ailsa  so I came to think that the world is crowded (perhaps overcrowded but it’s a matter of taste) of signs – everyone talks about Kilroy was here first of all – so it must really be Kilroy who make all the signs stuff – it also made me think of a sign on the little tiny island Samsø were I’m born (many years ago) – a sign which has always amused me.

When you drive from the middle of the tiny island to the south-west end. 

When you reach the small village of Kolby Kaas, then there is on the right side a sign indicating what it’s called and that speed doesn’t exceed 50 km/h – in fact, as the name might not appear on the sign, because in Denmark there rules for this – there must live at least 200 people and yhat number of people not live in Kolby Kaas – on the wrong side of ‘oh no’ on the left side of the road is the “funny” sign.

It says in Danish when you drive into the village “Thank you for visiting – see you soon”
 start by saying it to people who perhaps have never been there before
 who stands in the doorway of home and say this ..?
I always wait until they had been visiting
before I say “see you soon” to the guests
  also to see how good their manes are. 

On the other side of the sign, when you drive out of the villige – they wish you “welcome to Samsø” – maybe that little village on the island don’t belonging to the island..? 

Maybe the right place for the sign would be down where the tourists leave det ferry.  

Straight out of Kolby Kaas (after you have been welcomed to the island or before you becomes thanks for the visit)  is the island’s mill, built in 1898, no longer in use – but acts as a sort of mini museum as tourist can visit. 

There are also signs related to a mill the turbine blades must stand as they do – they may not be a cruciform – millers were generally very superstitious and it means bad luck actually would mean that the miller will die soon – if a miller dies, then the family turn the turbine blades so they appear as a cruciform.

 
Reklamer

Kiss the frog

The frogs “Raja” and “Rani” was married to each other in India

the distinctive wedding was to please the rain’god,

because the monsoon was about 2-3 weeks late..

…..

The symbolism of the often used phrase “to kiss the frog” is to dare to search for anything you want from something which on the surface does not resemble what you want

 just one kiss will change it til the desired …

Maybe you have to do a lot of kissing… 😉

…..

Here in the modern and imaginative world you go the other way

 lots of ‘princesses’ looking for the right gentleman perhaps on the white horse 

so they kiss a whole lot of princes 

which immediately transformed into frogs.